Wednesday
Feb202013

Artwork on Display @ 1600 Penn

Earlier this week we shared a picture on our facebook page showing a chandelier that is currently decorating the White House. Today we'd like to take a look at some of the art that has been on loan over the past few years. It was amazing to read about how much impact these artwork decisions could have on an artists life - such as in one case increasing the artwork's value up to 300%! Not too shabby.

The Obamas preferences tend towards modern art and they, along with their selected interior designer Michael Smith (!) made a wish list of about 45 artists. From that list here are a few images of my personal favorites.  Check out these links for more artwork and information (wsj) (nytimes). And check out the Google Art Project for an interactive tour!!

Click to read more...



 This vibrant work "I think I'll..." from California based artist Ed Ruscha

 

Nice geometric piece "Sky Light" by Alma Thomas



Ombre style created with stencil "Black Like Me No.2" by Glenn Ligon

 

Josef Albers homage to the square (not sure which one they picked but here is an example)

 

And the unique choice of a patent model! The "Electric Telegraph Patent Model, May 1, 1849" by Samuel F.B. Morse. Patent 6,420. From an industrial design perspective this is amazing! I love this history and appreciation of this aspect of product design.

 

And it gets better, look at how they styled other patent models on a bookshelf

 

And speaking of bookshelves... take a look at the trendy idea of painting the back of your bookshelves to add a pop of color. 

 

I hope you enjoyed taking a peak through some current artwork on display at the White House. Stay tuned later this week for a post about room design through the presidencies. I've been compiling images and they are a fascinating collection showing style changes over time!

Cheers,

If you would like help picking out artwork for your home contact us

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